Rushdoony: The Failure of Men

Early in the modern era (only in the nineteenth century in the United States), men abandoned the family and its responsibilities to their wives, and religion was similarly relegated to women as their concern. Men chose irresponsibility, and the double standard became a way of life. Of course, men insisted on all the Biblical authority given to a man while denying its responsibilities, forgetting that … Continue reading Rushdoony: The Failure of Men

Mercatornet: Lost children of Castro’s revolution

Since Castro’s death there has been raised interest to look inside world he created. The conditions women live under, the compulsion, their lives planned from beginning to end is enough to make us weep. And here in America we’re embracing aspects of this Cuban life as though we’d been denied some great privilege. Feminism would have us grasp at our very deaths. If you find … Continue reading Mercatornet: Lost children of Castro’s revolution

Walsh: Clinton Win Not a Victory for Women

  [A] Hillary Clinton victory will not be a victory for women. It will be a victory for the Democrats, for liberal elites, for the multiple foreign governments who’ve hacked her emails, for Wall Street bankers, for the media, for whoever stitches together her sci-fi pantsuits, for fans of spirit cooking, for her SNL impersonator; it will be a victory for all sorts of nefarious people, none more … Continue reading Walsh: Clinton Win Not a Victory for Women

Douthat: The Post-Familial Election

“you should have had more children when you had the chance.” My maternal great-grandfather had five children, four of whom lived to have families of their own. His son, my grandfather, also had five children, two sons and three daughters, who grew up as part of a dense network of cousins. On my father’s side, the families were a little smaller. But my dad was … Continue reading Douthat: The Post-Familial Election

Desiring God: From Medical Doctor to Stay-At-Home Mom

I studied biochemistry at a women’s college, attended medical school, and pursued specialty training in surgery, a field in which male practitioners outnumber women four to one. After residency, I sub-specialized in trauma surgery. I opened chests, got bloody, and returned dying kids to their mothers. I taught, wrote papers, edited books, and spoke at national meetings. In the halo of my success, my husband … Continue reading Desiring God: From Medical Doctor to Stay-At-Home Mom

World Magazine: Rosaria Butterfield, No Free Passes

I interviewed Rosaria Butterfield 3½ years ago as her first book, The Secret Thoughts of an Unlikely Convert, was coming out and heading toward wide readership. Since then she’s spoken widely throughout the United States and sometimes faced LGBTQ demonstrators displeased with her movement from lesbianism (and a tenured Syracuse professorship in women’s studies) to Christian believer and pastor’s wife. Here are edited excerpts of … Continue reading World Magazine: Rosaria Butterfield, No Free Passes

Monstrous Regiment of Woman: Interview with female former cadet

Women in the Military: “At some point during the training [female cadets] would have a crying fit, at which some men would feel sorry for them or would be like, “I don’t know what to do.” Other men would just look at them and be like, “Humph, she’s weak.” So I say it depends on the individual. Some who were sexually assaulted, it was basically … Continue reading Monstrous Regiment of Woman: Interview with female former cadet

Vernick: 5 Indicators of an Evil and Wicked Heart

Titus 2 women who spend time counseling in the Christian community will appreciate this. By Leslie Vernick As Christian counselors, pastors and people helpers we often have a hard time discerning between an evil heart and an ordinary sinner who messes up, who isn’t perfect, and full of weakness and sin. I think one of the reasons we don’t “see” evil is because we find … Continue reading Vernick: 5 Indicators of an Evil and Wicked Heart

Phylicia Delta: How I let go of the woman I wanted to be

I spent years molding myself into my ideal woman. I had a vision for who she would be. I was fairly certain that, with enough work, I could make her happen. I could be all the things: educated, well dressed, articulate, political, logical, and – the end goal – successful. Then I had a baby. When God brought me home – literally and figuratively – the limits I’d … Continue reading Phylicia Delta: How I let go of the woman I wanted to be